The Rest of the List


Premieres

-- "Assassination of a High School President," directed by Brett Simon and written by Kevin Jakubowski, tells of a high-school journalist (Reece Thompson) teaming up with the popular girl (Mischa Barton) to uncover a plot involving stolen SAT tests. Bruce Willis, Michael Rapaport and Kathryn Morris co-star.
-- "Be Kind Rewind," written and directed by Michel Gondry ("The Science of Sleep"), stars Jack Black as a man whose accidentally magnetized body erases all the tapes in a video store, leading him and the store owner (Mos Def) to re-enact scenes for the store's main customer (Mia Farrow).
-- "CSNY Deja Vu," a look at Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young's "Freedom of Speech Tour," as echoes of the '60s play out among today's audiences. Directed by Bernard Shakey (a k a Neil Young), written by Young and Mike Cerre. Closing Night Film.
-- "The Deal" (Canada), directed by Steven Schachter and written by William H. Macy and Schachter, an adaptation of Peter Lefcourt's novel about a suicidal Hollywood producer (Macy) conning a studio to bankroll a $100-million action movie, with a black star (LL Cool J) who recently converted to Judaism. Also stars Meg Ryan.
-- "Death in Love," written and directed by Boaz Yakin ("Remember the Titans"), follows a 40-year-old bachelor (Josh Lucas) as he deals with his sexual relationships and the concentration-camp experiences of his mother (Jacqueline Bisset). Adam Brody and Lukas Haas co-star.
-- "Diminished Capacity," directed by actor Terry Kinney ("Oz") and written by Sherwood Kiraly, stars Matthew Broderick as a man who takes his Alzheimer's-afflicted uncle (Alan Alda) and his old flame (Virginia Madsen) to a sports-memorabilia expo to sell the uncle's rare baseball card. Dylan Baker also stars.
-- "The Escapist" (Ireland), directed by Rupert Wyatt and directed by Wyatt and Daniel Hardy, centers on a prison inmate (Brian Cox), 12 years into a life sentence, who decides to organize a prison break so he can make peace with his sick daughter. Joseph Fiennes, Damian Lewis (TV's "Life") and Brazilian actor/singer Seu Jorge co-star.
-- "The Great Buck Howard," written and directed by Sean McGinly, is a has-been magician (John Malkovich) who hires a law-school dropout (Colin Hanks) as an assistant, much to the chagrin of the young man's father (Tom Hanks). Emily Blunt and Steve Zahn also star. Salt Lake City gala premiere.
-- "The Guitar," directed by Amy Redford (yes, Robert's daughter) and written by Amos Poe, stars Saffron Burrows as a woman whose life changes three ways -- she's diagnosed with a terminal disease, fired from her job and abandoned by her boyfriend -- so she opts to pursue her dreams.
-- "Henry Poole Is Here," directed by Mark Pellington ("Going All the Way," Sundance '97) and written by Albert Torres, stars Luke Wilson as a man who believes he's dying, so he leaves his fiancee and family business for a solitary life - which is interrupted by an apparent miracle and his odd neighbors.
-- "In Bruges" (United Kingdom/Ireland), directed and written by Martin McDonagh, stars Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson as London hitmen on a forced vacation in Belgium. Opening Night Film, previously announced.
-- "Incendiary" (United Kingdom), written and directed by Sharon Maguire ("Bridget Jones' Diary"), tells of a woman (Michelle Williams) whose life is shattered when her husband and son are killed in a terrorist bombing at a soccer game.
-- "Merry Gentleman", directed by Michael Keaton and written by Ron Lazzeretti, stars Kelly Macdonald ("No Country For Old Men") as a woman fleeing an abusive marriage who stumbles into a friendship with a depressed hitman (Keaton).
-- "A Raisin in the Sun," directed by Kenny Leon and written by Paris Qualles, remakes Lorraine Hansberry's classic play about the struggles of an African-American family. Sean Combs plays the role originated by Sidney Poitier; Audra McDonald and Phylicia Rashad co-star.
-- "Savage Grace," directed by Tom Kalin and written by Howard A. Rodman, the true-life story of Barbara Daly (Julianne Moore), married to the heir to the Bakelite plastics fortune (Stephen Dillane), and the tragedy involving their son (Eddie Redmayne).
-- "Sleepwalking" (Canada), directed by Bill Maher (not the comedian) and written by Zac Stanford, about a man (Nick Stahl) who must take responsibility to keep his niece (AnnaSophia Robb) from going to a foster home. Charlize Theron, Dennis Hopper and Woody Harrelson also star.
-- "Smart People," directed by Noam Murro and written by Mark Jude Poirier, stars Dennis Quaid as a literature professor who must confront his own life when his brother (Thomas Haden Church) unexpectedly shows up. Sarah Jessica Parker and Ellen Page ("Juno") also star.
-- "Towelhead" (formerly known as "Nothing Is Private"), the feature directing debut of "American Beauty" writer Alan Ball, is about a 13-year-old Arab-American girl (Summer Bishil) dealing with adolescence. Aaron Eckhart, Maria Bello and Toni Collette also star.
-- "Transsiberian" (Spain), directed by Brad Anderson ("Next Stop Wonderland," Sundance '99) and written by Anderson and Will Conroy, is a thriller about an American couple (Woody Harrelson and Emily Mortimer) caught up in murder and intrigue on a train from China to Moscow. Kate Mara and Ben Kingsley co-star.
-- "U2 3D," directed by Catherine Owens and Mark Pellington ("Henry Poole Is Here," see above), captures the band's "Vertigo" tour, usng more 3D cameras than ever before assembled for a single project.
-- "The Visitor," written and directed by Tom McCarthy ("The Station Agent," Sundance '03), about a college professor (Richard Jenkins) who finds an immigrant couple living in his Manhattan apartment.
-- "What Just Happened?" directed by Barry Levinson ("Diner," "Rain Man," "Wag the Dog") and written by Art Linson (adapting his book), stars Robert DeNiro as a movie producer dealing with a crazed director, a shameless actor and other indignities. Also starring Bruce Willis, Sean Penn, Catherine Keener, Stanley Tucci and John Turturro.
-- "The Year of Getting to Know Us," directed and written by Patrick Sisam, stars Jimmy Fallon as a commitment-phobe who reunites with his ailing father (Tom Arnold). Sharon Stone and Lucy Liu also star.
-- "The Yellow Hankerchief," directed by Udayan Prasad and written by Erin Dignam, brings together a recently released inmate and two disillusioned young people on a Louisiana road trip. Maria Bello and William Hurt star.

Spectrum: Documentary Spotlight

-- "Anvil... The True Story of Anvil," directed by Sacha Gervasi, follows two aging rockers trying one last time to make the big time.
-- "The Black List," directed by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and written by Elvis Mitchell, features Mitchell, the journalist and critic, interviewing a slew of African-American leaders to "glimpse into the zeitgeist of black America." -- "Kicking It," directed and written by Susan Koch, follows six homeless people competing in an international soccer competition in South Africa.
-- "The Linguists," directed by Seth Kramer, Daniel Miller and Jeremy Newberger, and written by Miller, follows David and Greg, two men who document languages on the verge of extinction.
-- "Made in America," in which director Stacy Peralta ("Dogtown and Z-Boys," Sundance '01; "Riding Giants," Sundance '04) looks at the gang war between the Crips and the Bloods and the conditions that caused it.
-- "Where in the World Is Osama Bin Laden?" (France), directed by Morgan Spurlock ("Super Size Me," Sundance '04) and written by Jeremy Chilnick and Spurlock, has the firebrand director searching the Middle East for the Al Qaeda leader.
-- "Young@Heart" (United Kingdom), directed by Stephen Walker, profiles a choir of Massachusetts senior citizens who cover everyone from The Clash to Jimi Hendrix.

Spectrum

-- "August," directed by Austin Chick and written by Howard A. Rodman, centers on a dot-com entrepreneur (Josh Hartnett) trying to keep his head above water in August 2001, a month before 9/11.
-- "Baghead," directed and written by Mark Duplass and Jay Duplass ("The Puffy Chair," Sundance '05), follows two couples' efforts to write the great American screenplay, as they are stalked by a man with a bag on his head.
-- "Birds of America," directed by Craig Lucas ("The Dying Gaul," Sundance '05) and written by Elyse Friedman, stars Matthew Perry as a regular guy dealing with his offbeat siblings (Ginnifer Goodwin and Ben Foster). Hilary Swank also stars.
-- "Blind Date," directed by Stanley Tucci and written by Tucci and David Schechter, a remake of a film by Dutch director Theo van Gogh (whose "Interview" was remade by Steve Buscemi), with Tucci and Patricia Clarkson as a married couple trying to reconnect by meeting as different people through the personal ads.
-- "Bottle Shock," directed by Randall Miller and written by Jody Savin and Miller, recounts the infamous 1976 blind wine-tasting in Paris that signaled the birth of the California wine industry. Alan Rickman, Bill Pullman, Freddy Rodriguez and Chris Pine co-star.
-- "Chronic Town," directed by Tom Hines and written by Michael Kamsky, centers on a drug-addicted cabbie weathering a cold Alaska winter with help from his friends.
-- "Goliath," directed by David and Nathan Zellner and written by David Zellner, who plays a man with a slew of problems who aims to solve one of them: Finding his missing cat, Goliath.
-- "A Good Day to Be Black & Sexy," written and directed by Dennis Dortch, six vignettes of sex and relationships in L.A.'s African-American community.
-- "Love Comes Lately" (Germany/Austria), written and directed by Jan Schütte, based on stories by Isaac Bashevis Singer, tells of an 80-year-old man (Otto Tausig) still going strong in romance. Rhea Perlman and Barbara Hershey also star.
-- "Momma's Man," written and directed by Azazel Jacobs, tells of a man avoiding family responsibility who changes his mind after a stay in his parents' loft.
-- "Quid Pro Quo," written and directed by Carlos Brooks, features a paraplegic radio reporter (Nick Stahl) who discovers a subculture of able-bodied people who want to be paralyzed. Vera Farmiga and Kate Burton co-star.
-- "Red," directed by Trygve Diesen and Lucky McKee and written by Stephen Susco, shows what happens when three teens kill an old dog for fun, and the dog's owner (Brian Cox) demands accountability.

New Frontier

-- "casting a glance," written and directed by James Benning, looks at the evolution of Robert Smithson's legendary Spiral Jetty sculpture, and its 30 years of ebb and flow in the Great Salt Lake.
-- "Eat, for This Is My Body (Mange, cece est mon corps)" (France/Haiti), written and directed by Michelange Quay, a meditative drama about racial conquest and liberation in Haiti.
-- "Fear(s) of the Dark (Peur(s) du noir)" (France), in which 10 graphic artists and cartoonists (including Blutch, Charles Burns, Marie Callou, Romain Slocombe, Pierre Di Sciullio, Lorenzo Mattotti and Jerry Kramsky) draw out their nightmares and phobias.
-- "Half-Life," written and directed by Jennifer Phang, shows siblings dealing with long-buried issues as signs of global trouble escalate.
-- "Reversion," written and directed by Mia Trachinger, tells of a woman genetically devoid of morality trying to maintain her romance with the man she loves.

Park City at Midnight
-- "Adventures of Power," directed and written by Ari Gold, who plays the title character, a small-town guy who dreams of being the world's greatest air-drummer. Adrian Grenier and Jane Lynch also star.
-- "The Brøken," written and directed by Sean Ellis, a horror thriller that starts when a woman (Lena Headey) sees herself driving by in her own car.
-- "George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead," written and directed by George A. Romero, as the horror-meister tells of film-school students filming a zombie movie and encountering the real thing. Some famous directors (Wes Craven, Stephen King, Quentin Tarantino and Guillermo del Toro) show up as well.
-- "Donkey Punch" (United Kingdom), directed by Olly Blackburn and written by Blackburn and David Bloom, a thriller about partygoers on a yacht who fight for survival when one of them turns up dead.
-- "Funny Games," writer-director Michael Haneke's English-language remake of his acclaimed 1997 German-French thriller, in which a family (led by Tim Roth and Naomi Watts) is terrorized by two psychotic preppies (Michael Pitt and Brady Corbet).
-- "Hell Ride," written and directed by Larry Bishop, a modern take on '60s motorcycle movies, presented by Quentin Tarantino. Bishop leads a cast that includes Dennis Hopper and Michael Madsen.
-- "Otto (Up With Dead People)" (Germany/Canada), written and directed by Bruce LaBruce ("Raspberry Reich," Sundance '04), about a lonely gay zombie in Berlin.
-- "Timecrimes (Los Cronocrímenes)" (Spain), directed and written by Nacho Vigalondo, in which a man travels back in time and meets himself, and a series of mysteries leading to a heinous crime.